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St. Patrick's Catholic Church Kogarah St. Patrick's Catholic Church Kogarah

About St. Patrick's Catholic Church Kogarah About St. Patrick's Catholic Church Kogarah

Our Staff
Henryk Micek
    Monsignor - Pastor and Administrator

Julie Upton
    Parish Secretary - Tuesdays & Wednesdays

Christine Thornborough
    Parish Secretary - Mondays & Fridays

Vicki Harcourt
    Parish - Housekeeper / Admin Assistant

Tammy Mellar
    Music Co-ordinator

Shanta Lang
    Organist

St. Patrick's Catholic Church Kogarah
38 Chapel StreetMap
Kogarah, Australia, NSW 2217
Phone: (61) 295 875 444
Email: tpg.com.au@stpatkog

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Church History

ST PATRICK’S CATHOLIC PARISH

KOGARAH

MEMORIES THROUGH THE YEARS

 

The parish church at Kogarah, St Patrick's, looks serenely across the highway at Moorefield High School. But, before there was a high school, there was Moorefield Racecourse. And, before the racecourse, there was landowner Patrick Moore. Moore of Moorefield combined with other Catholics, like Edmond English, to build a school. In the beginning was the school. The church followed, then a presbytery. The church was tended by a succession of priests, the most, long serving of whom was Monsignor J.J. O'Driscoll. The school was in time taken over by the daughters of our own Blessed Mary Mackillop, the Josephite Sisters. Such is the outline of our story. We are fortunate to have parishioners of long-standing in Kogarah, along with many who have now moved away from Kogarah, but who remember how all this was fleshed out; who remember the touch and taste and tension of what we sometimes call "the good old days". Their combined input does not add up to a definitive history.

Perhaps their combined input is more valuable, because it conveys the flavour of how we were ... And our story comes full circle to a repeat of our beginnings, with a review of our school, our presbytery our church, as they are in A.D. 2004.

 

 Let's start at the very beginning:

THE BEGINNING - SCHOOL

 A Rocky Point Road Catholic School opened in 1862 with an enrolment of eleven boys and ten girls. A short time later the teacher was transferred and the school closed. It re-opened in 1864, on the eastern side of Rocky Point road, just south of the Moorefield Estate. There were nineteen children on the roll, under Miss M Eyre who was paid £60 per annum. The inspector reported:
“ The children are taught in a wooden building in fair repair. The room in which the school is held is 24 feet by 12 feet by 10 feet, not ceiled (sic). No out-offices or a residence for the teacher. There is plenty of playground. A new schoolhouse is very much needed in this district.”

According to reports:

“The circumstances of the people (that is, of the young scholars’ parents) were not good; wood carting and gardening were the two things by which the people lived. The wood carters were poor, and the gardeners who were occupants of new ground were struggling.”

Notwithstanding, it is understood they were able to raise £20 to purchase one acre of land from Charles Bown “for the erection and maintenance thereon of a schoolhouse for the Education of Roman Catholic children.”

The acre of land in question is that on which St Patrick’s Church is now built. The purchase was made on 20 April 1865. The Trustees were Most Reverend John Bede Polding, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sydney; the Reverend Patrick Keynon of Redfern, Clerk in Holy Orders; Patrick Moore and Edmond English, both farmers of Rocky Point.

Plans were made for a stone building and the deeds of the property were submitted to the Denominational School Board on 11 December 1865, for a grant towards the cost of the building. It was estimated that the total expense would be £120. A grant of £30 was approved, plus £4.10.0 towards the furnishings. Apparently the construction work was already under way, because “1865” was carved on the lintel above the school entrance. 

The new stone edifice measured 30 by 17 by 10 feet internally, with a galvanised roof. It was reported to be “a very neat building, pleasantly situated on a rising ground .…It is light, well ventilated, and every way suited for a schoolroom. There is one acre of land, fenced from the Road, but not otherwise enclosed. There is no residence for the teacher and no closet .The Local Board have made great exertions to build this School; their means are now exhausted.”

On 15 May 1866, Father Garavel opened the new building with the celebration of Mass. The children from Cook’s River visited the school and all the scholars had a feast and sports outing. It was a fine day. The children had their fill of cakes, fruit and lollies. Prizes were given for running, jumping etc., causing a friendly rivalry between the competitors. After hymns were sung, the children reached home about 5 o’clock without suffering any accident to mar the day’s sports.

St Patrick’s Catholic School c. 1870’s. This was the first school in the Kogarah area, it was established in the early 1860’s and a few years later moved into this building on the St Patrick’s Church site. Although the photograph is not very clear, it shows a female teacher with her 15 or so boys (and a dog) to her right, and about twenty girls to her left.

 Kogarah now had a church-school, which was to play such an important role in the life of Catholics of the district for the next 90 years.

 There were now two school buildings in the grounds. The original stone church-school, which had been extended by the addition of about 15 feet to its length, it was used as a day school. The additional school building, funded by the generosity of the local Catholics, was used for an infant’s school. At the rear and fenced off was the cemetery. This was said to be small with not many graves, but was well looked after with trees and shrubs planted. 

The ‘Old School’ as it was in 1930’s with evidence of the Graveyard behind the Coral trees and the tennis court to the left of the building. The tennis court was used socially at weekends.

The little stone schoolhouse served several generations of Catholic families, and the nearby churchyard became the playground of the school children. With the course of progress, the stone schoolhouse had to pay the price when it became too small for the needs of the growing population. The stone over the door has been incorporated in the wall of the new school. The original inscription was:

St Patrick’s Schoole 1865.” The additional inscription has been made:

 “With grateful appreciation of those whose efforts led to its erection, this stone from the first building on this site, recently demolished, has been re-set here. Requiescant in Peace – 23.1.55. Rev T O’Farrell, PP.”

 An extract from the Freeman’s Journal dated 19 March 1914 covers the blessing of the “New School at Kogarah” it reads as follows: 
 
The Foundation Stone for the new St Patrick’s School. The inscription reads ‘This Stone was blessed and laid by the Most Rev. M. Kelly D. D. 15 March 1914’.

The Archbishop of Sydney celebrated 10 o’clock Mass at Kogarah on Sunday, and in the afternoon blessed the foundation stone of a new school. The old school, in the beginning used also as a church, was opened in 1865 by Archbishop Polding. Today it is being used as infants’ school. His Grace the Archbishop was assisted in the religious ceremonies by the Rev. M. Sherin (his chaplain), Rev. M. O’Donoghue, assistant to Rev. J. J. O’Driscoll, who was absent owing to an accident. At the subsequent public meeting his Grace the Archbishop presided. Others present included Revs. R. Collender, T. Barry, P. Briody, H. Conaghan, P. Walsh, J. Cusack, Rev. Brothers Gonzaga and Phillip; Messrs J.J. Kavanagh (secretary of the church committee), J. Schmitt, F. B. Davis, M.McCole, W. Hatfield, W. A. Davis, J. Devitt, M. O’Meara, B. Walz, J. Cusick, D. Maloney, J. J. Maloney, W. Fitzgerald, M. Rodgers, J. Foley, L. Kavanagh, H. Mullarkey and J. Rogan.

After welcoming the Archbishop of Sydney, Father O’Donoghue referred to the excellence of the proposed school, and said that the contract price was £925. With regard to the finances of the parish, Father O’Donoghue stated that the debt on the Brothers’ school was £480.19.11. It was the desire of the parishioners to have the Sisters residing in Kogarah, and a cottage was purchased for them at a cost of £450; but it was found too small, and was now let at 16shillingsa week. Another home was brought for the nuns for £660 while the recent additions to the presbytery ran into £500. It was this outlay that delayed the erection of the new school.

The Archbishop of Sydney sympathetically referred to the enforced absence of Father O’Driscoll, who was suffering from the effects of a gas explosion, which might have had more serious consequences than it had. They would all be glad, however, to know that their pastor was making rapid progress to recovery, and would soon be amongst them again. He was happy to be with them to inaugurate such a work as they were beginning that day; the house for the nuns who taught the children and the school claimed first place, coming even before the church or the presbytery. His Grace went on to deal with the failure of the Education Act.

On the motion of Mr W. A. Davis, the subscription list was opened, and on that of Mr D. Maloney a vote of thanks was accorded the Archbishop.

The subscriptions totalled £307; one generous donor gave £50

Late in 1914 the single storey school building was opened. This building fronted onto Chapel Street, Kogarah, behind the original stone school. Father John Joseph O’Driscoll played an important role in ensuring the future of the school. In the early 1920’s he saw the need to provide additional accommodation for the children, extending the school by means of a storey, which meant incurring a further debt of £1442. In 1923 His Grace, the Archbishop of Sydney blessed and opened this addition to the school.

The Blessing of the new St Patrick’s School 1914 by His Grace Archbishop Michael Kelly. The foundation stone, which had been blessed and laid, by His Grace Archbishop Michael Kelly D.D. on 15 March 1914 can be seen in the lower side of the building. (Photo September 1990)

The Sisters of St Joseph answered the challenge to administer St Patrick’s School. From 1911 to 1985 the Sisters had a major presence in the school fulfilling the roles of Principal and teacher. The Sisters withdrew from the school at the end of 1985 and from this time the Catholic Education Office has appointed lay principals.

In 1955 the present administration building was opened. Additional classrooms were built on the north side of the site during 1970-71. Refurbishment of the Chapel Street building took place in 1983. This building now contains classrooms and a general-purpose area, which serves both school and parish.

CHURCH

Kogarah, in 1866 had a church-school but no resident priest and it was not yet a parish. One factor aiding that fuller ecclesiastical development was what might be termed ‘the Hurstville prod’. Sketchily, the prod worked as follows:

Hurstville, about 2.5kms west of Kogarah, was not at first a site for close settlement because of the magnificent stands of timber there. In 1850 Michael Gannon, tollgate master and later innkeeper at Tempe, purchased the Hurstville land which became known as Gannon’s Forest. In 1855 he donated two acres of this Forest property as the site for a Catholic Church. (In the third millennium, this land remains the site of the St Michael’s Parish Church and School). By the end of 1855 Hurstville was selected as the residence of Father Peter Byrne, the first priest appointed in the St George district, and the new St Michael’s Church thus became the mother church of the district.

In Kogarah, awareness dawned that Hurstville had stolen a holy march and that a holy reaction was called for, they discovered that they were now no more that a station within the Hurstville parish. Population slowly increased until the advent of the railway in 1884, which passed through as far as Hurstville, this brought such an influx of people that there was a need for a larger building to accommodate the Catholics in the district.

Plans for a new church were soon under-way. The new church was designed by Messrs. Sheerin and Hennessy, Architects, and was to be in transition Gothic. The principal measurements were:

  • Length without sanctuary - 85 feet
  • Sanctuary and vestry - 23 feet
  • Nave - 35 feet
  • Transepts - 60 feet
  • Tower - 14 feet square

The building was to be pressed brick with stone dressings at an estimated cost of £6,000. However at this time, the contractors, Messrs Simmons and Knight were to complete only the first stage of the building – able to accommodate five to six hundred people – at a cost of £2,200.

On Sunday 29 April 1887, the foundation stone of the new church was laid in front of the original stone church-school. His Eminence Cardinal Moran, came to Kogarah to perform the ceremony. In honour of the Cardinal’s visit, the church grounds were festively decorated and an arch was erected with the words Caed Mille Failthe – Advance Kogarah.”

On the occasion of the laying of the foundation stone, the proceedings began with a procession from the old stone church-school to the adjoining site of the new building. After the stone had been laid and blessed, the Cardinal addressed the assemblage, the Very Reverend Father Slattery O.S.F. delivered the formal address, and then Father Peter Byrne spoke a few words and called on the people to show their “proverbial generosity”. They certainly did, £685 was collected and in the expressive ritual of the time, this sum was placed on the foundation stone. The crowd, which numbered several hundred, then dispersed.

In ten months, the first stage of a new St Patrick’s Church was completed. Cardinal Moran returned to bless and open the church, on Sunday afternoon, 19 February 1888. The weather was exquisitely fine, as the Cardinal was welcomed by the Reverend Father Peter Byrne, pastor, the clergy and leading Catholics of the district. Following the blessing and the singing by a choir from St Mary’s Cathedral, the Reverend Father O’Connor delivered an eloquent address from the Sanctuary steps. The church was named after the Apostle of Ireland, St Patrick.

The appearance of the front of the church was very striking; the Gothic features of the arched central entrance, with its flight of steps and the graceful three-light windows all executed in white stone, showing out in fine relief from the more sombre brick. Thus, providing a building to accommodate 500 to 600 people, which could rival the modest parish church at Hurstville. The new church was boarded up at the western end to allow for the second stage extension, and only the base of the tower, to the height of the walls, had been built.

Peter Moore, squire of Moorefields, went a step further in 1889 and provided a presbytery for Father Peter Byrne at Kogarah, thus wooing him away from St Michael’s Church Hurstville and effectively relocating the ecclesiastical administration of St George district. Although Hurstville remained officially the parish church for the district until 1907, it saw the priest only as a visitor after 1889.

In The Sydney Echo(16/10/1890), there is an enthusiastic description of the new St Patrick’s at Kogarah:

“The church, although only about half the proposed size, is the largest and handsomest in the huge original parish of St George. It is of brick, with stone cornices, pointing, window and doorframes, etc., and is in the modern ornamental style of church architecture, being a mixture of Italian and Gothic. The interior is beautifully fitted and finished _”

By June 1899, Edmond English was the sole surviving Trustee, the others – Archbishop John Bede Polding, Patrick Kenyon and Peter Moore – having long since died. New trustees appointed were Father Michael Macnamara and James English, produce merchant.

The long rule of Reverend Father John Joseph O’Driscoll began in 1904 and during his time the church was completed according to plans. The sanctuary and transepts were completed and first used in 1918. The bell tower was completed and the bell dedicated on St Patrick’s Day 1936.

The bell bears the inscription in Latin:

“John Joseph O’Driscoll, the successor of Peter Byrne, first pastor of this parish, gave me in pious memory of him so that I might call the faithful to St Patrick’s Church to give praise to God.”

The slender brick tower was completed with a donation of £800, from the Moore family, in memory of departed members of the family. A brass plate records their names in Latin.

The Moore family also donated one of the main stained glass windows above the altar. The families of English, Beavers, Dillon, Radecki, Davis, Duffy, Rogers, Fox, McCole, Arundell and Madden and the names of the men who died in the 1914-1918 war are remembered in the other original windows.

The first altar was wooden, and a marble altar, the gift of the O’Meara family, replaced this.

Sources for ‘A SCHOOL’ and ‘A CHURCH’ : Max Barrett, CssR; Dr Joan Hatton; Errol Lea-Scarlett; Sydney Morning Herald; The Freeman’s Journal;Register Generals Office – Land Titles,New South WalesStateArchives. Sydney Archdiocesan Archives. 

 

PRESBYTERY

In 1897 St Patrick’s Kogarah had a presbytery. The blessing and opening of the presbytery was captured in a report printed in The Freeman’s Journal, July 3 1897. A reprint of that report follows:

The Presbytery at Kogarah

On Sunday afternoon, the new presbytery adjoining St Patrick’s Church, Kogarah, was blessed and opened. His Eminence the Cardinal-Archbishop was to have performed the ceremony, and the local Hibernians had arranged a guard of honour. Shortly before three o’clock the Very Reverend Dr. Carroll, Vicar–General arrived. He was the bearer of a message from the Cardinal. His Eminence, on account of the indisposition of his Lordship Dr. Higgins, had to go to St. Peter’s, Surry Hills, to give Confirmation. The Vicar General then blessed the new building, with Father Macnamara (priest in charge of the district) assisting. The other priests present were the Rev. J Milne Curran, F.G.S., the Rev. O. Conway (P.P. Burwood), the Rev. R. M. O’Callaghan (Pyrmont) and the Rev. Father McGrath, SJ, of St Aloysius College. Seated with others in the church benches, where a meeting was held after the ceremony, were Mr Charles Bull MP, and Mrs Bull, Mr Peter Moore, Mr and Mrs J. W. James, Mr J. F. Hegarty, Mr E. English, Mr James English, Mr John English, Mr Wellaghan, Mr Hugh Roarty, Mr S. A. Burns, Mr John Walz, Miss Walz, Mrs Hill, Mr Quayle, Mrs Osborne, Mr Davis, Mr McCole, Mr D O’Brien, Mr McHugh, Mr Quirk, Mr John Walsh and Mr Radecki

The Very Rev. Chairman said that he had attended as the unworthy deputy of the Cardinal-Archbishop. His Eminence was engaged that afternoon and his Lordship Dr Higgins was indisposed. He (Dr Carroll) knew that it was a great disappointment to the people of Kogarah, and he would not attempt the task of representing his Eminence, save in a very humble way. He was in no position to make a speech suitable to the occasion. But he knew how necessary this presbytery was and with his knowledge of their needs during the past few years he could understand how delighted they were to have this blessing and opening (Applause). He admired the energetic way in which their present pastor had set about this work and he congratulated all concerned on the happy completion. If he spoke all that was in his mind, he might give offence to Father Macnamara. Their pastor being present, he (Dr Carroll) reserved his praise. The whole district had reason to rejoice in having this presbytery so well built at so small a cost. It was a substantial as well as a good-looking building and compared with similar works of which he had personal knowledge the cost was amazingly small. (Hear, hear). Fr Macnamara had saved them some hundreds of pounds. (Applause) 

Father Macnamara had made an excellent beginning as pastor of the Kogarah district (Applause) and other good works would doubtless follow. He trusted that their pastor would remain amongst them for many years, and that the present unity in thought and action would continue with most gratifying results. (Applause)

Father Macnamara then, at the Vicar General’s request, made a financial statement. He regretted, as they all did, the Cardinal’s absence (Hear, hear) and with all respect to their kind friend, the Vicar General, he felt, if he might say so, that a gathering of that kind without his Eminence was as incomplete as “Hamlet” without the prince. (Applause and laughter). They all desired to do honour to his Eminence, and the genuineness of this feeling was shown by the presence of a number of their non-Catholic friends. (Hear, hear) With respect to the erection of the presbytery, he must say that they had a difficulty to face at the commencement. The parish debt was so heavy that it took some thought to prepare a practical scheme for raising the amount required for the new undertaking. There was a time when you could get a million from the banks for Catholic work (Laughter); but now things were changed, and it was very hard to get money on any conditions. The plan he proposed, and which was accepted, divided the cost between Kogarah, Hurstville and Rockdale. These three divisions of the district agreedto pay £100 each. The remainder of the sum was to be raised by a mortgage. Well, they started the building and he could state, having watched the work very closely, that it was a first-class job. (Applause) The architect, Mr Hill and the contractor, Mr Harradence, had given entire satisfaction. (Applause) As the Vicar General had said, £600, inclusive of the cost of the ground, paid by the Kogarah people, was a small amount for such an excellent building. (Hear, hear) Although they had not that great pleasure of hearing the Cardinal this afternoon, he believed there was no reason why, having had the blessing, they should not also have the other portion of the ceremony – the collection. (Hear, hear) He would now be happy to receive subscriptions.

The sum received was £40, including Dr Carroll, £1.1s; Father Conway, £1.1s; Father O’Callagan, £1.1s; Father Curran, £1.10s; Mr Peter Moore, £2.2s; Mr Hugh Roarty, £2.2s; Mr C. Bull MP, £1.1s; Mr James, £1.1s; Mr S. A. Burns, £2.2s. Altogether £150 has been contributed to the cost. Father Macnamara thanked all, especially their Protestant friends.

Mr Bull, MP, who was invited to address the assemblage, said that when he received a card of invitation for himself and his wife, he divined Father Macnamara’s object, and came provided with a few shillings. (Laughter) He was pleased to see other Protestants present, which showed that they were educated to the fact that the members of the different denominations should assist each other. He could go back to the time when he was associated at Campbelltown with one of the dearest prelates in Australia. He referred to the late Monsignor Lynch, with whom he joined in many movements for the general good. (Applause) That same feeling was in his heart now. (Applause) He joined in the expression of regret at the Cardinal’s absence, and sympathised with his Catholic friends that afternoon. (Hear, hear) He (Mr Bull) thought it would be some little compliment to the Cardinal if he attended the ceremony, and he had come at some inconvenience to show his respect. (Applause) He was glad to see Father Macnamara so well housed, and if their reverend friend were not comfortable in that cosy nest he would be hard to please. He (Mr Bull) congratulated both pastor and parishioners, and would be glad to assist on any future occasion. (Applause).

Mr H. F. Hegarty, in moving a vote of thanks to the Vicar General, said they were all the more obliged to Dr Carroll for having come to their aid at the last moment. The presbytery, which, thanks to Father Macnamara’s financial tactics, was now completed, was in every way worthy of the name. (Hear, hear) It was in the proper place, and no one would now have any difficulty in finding out where the parish priest lived. (Hear, hear) From the site they could see historic Botany Bay as a beautiful picture, and Father Macnamara would also have an uninterrupted view of the noble equines struggling for supremacy on the Moorefield course. (Laughter and applause) If his Eminence had attended that day he might, after the great success of his Fair at St Mary’s have been able to tell them how to clear off their parish debt of £1,300.

The vote of thanks was carried with hearty applause.

Dr Carroll thanked all for their kindness. He was glad to hear Mr Bull’s speech (Hear, hear) and he might remind Mr Bull that his own recollections of Campbelltown went back 55 years. He would go back and report to his Eminence the kindly sentiments expressed that day, and the spirit of harmony and earnestness exhibited. He was sure his Eminence would be very pleased with the report. (Applause)

The presbytery is in the Queen Anne style, and contains 6 rooms, kitchen, pantries, etc. It is a thoroughly sound and well-finished piece of work, besides having a picturesque appearance and reflects credit on Mr C. R. Hill, the architect and Mr James Harradence, the contractor. Over the entrance there is a shield bearing the Cardinal’s arms. All the interior appointments are excellent and the furnishing leaves nothing to be desired. 

 

 RIGHT REVEREND MONSIGNOR O’DRISCOLL (1904 - 1942)

The following article appeared in The Propeller on June 11, 1942.
DEATH OF VETERAN PRIEST
Tribute to Monsignor O’Driscoll

 Monsignor John Joseph O’Driscoll was born in County Cork, Ireland, in the year 1868. At the age of twenty-four years he left his native country and came to Australia. He had been ordained as a priest at All Hallows College, Dublin on June 24, 1892. Eventually he was appointed parish priest at the East Balmain Catholic Church. However, in 1904, he was transferred to the historic church of St Patrick’s Kogarah, which was then the centre of a huge parish extending from Cook’s river to Waterfall, including the Sutherland and Cronulla districts. Monsignor O’Driscoll had many happy reminiscences of his thirty-eight years association with the parish, having watched the district develop and progress from those pioneer days when he visited his scattered parishioners by riding on a bicycle, or perhaps with sulky and horse. There was a mere handful of people living in Cronulla and Sutherland, for instance, in those times. One of the most remarkable things which he had observed, after so many years of intimate contact with the district, was that, as far as its people were concerned, the character of a particular area never altered. Each district, such as Kogarah, Hurstville, Rockdale, Cronulla and so on, maintained its own special characteristics and those prevailed even with each succeeding generation.

Gradually through the years the original great parish under the leadership of Monsignor O’Driscoll, was subdivided into smaller districts, each with its own church. The Kogarah parish originally became separated from Sydney in 1887. After that, in 1913, portion of the original area was cut off to form the Hurstville parish. Next in succession were Rockdale and Penshurst in 1916, Arncliffe 1917, Cronulla 1924, South Hurstville 1933, Sutherland 1934, Brighton 1937, and the two youngest parishes, Sans Souci and Bexley in 1940 and Carlton 1957. Where there was but one huge parish in 1904 there were now eleven separate districts, each with its own church and at least one priest. During the long term of his office at Kogarah, Monsignor O’Driscoll had witnessed remarkable development in his own local church, not the least of which were the considerable extensions to St Patrick’s including the erection of a stately bell steeple in 1936. It is worthy of note, also, that Monsignor O’Driscoll was responsible for the founding of the Marist Brothers’ Boys High School, Kogarah. It was said to be the second largest of its kind in the State. An occasion of unusual significance in the life of Monsignor O’Driscoll was on Christmas Day 1940; he was amongst others, the recipient of a Papal honour from Pope Pius X11, when he was elevated to the status of domestic prelate, with which went the distinctive title of Monsignor. It was an honour of which he was both pleased and proud.

Monsignor J. J. O’Driscoll. Father J. J. O’Driscoll was elevated to the status of Monsignor in 1940. He passed away on Friday, 5th June 1942 at the age of seventy-three years. Solemn and impressive tributes were paid to the memory of the late Right Rev. Monsignor John J. O’Driscoll, P.P., V.F., at a Solemn Office and Requiem Mass conducted at St Patrick’s Catholic Church, Kogarah, prior to the funeral cortege leaving for Woronora Cemetery. He had been parish priest at St Patrick’s Kogarah for thirty-eight years and was one of the leading personalities in the ecclesiastical spheres of St George. Further, the 24th of June 1942 would have witnessed the golden jubilee anniversary of Monsignor O’Driscoll’s entry to the priesthood.

Archbishop Gilroy presided at Monsignor O’Driscoll’s Requiem and preached the panegyric. The celebrant of the Mass was Right Rev. Monsignor R. Collander, P.P., V.G., (parish priest of Woollahra), who was said to be Monsignor O’Driscoll’s greatest friend in the priesthood. About two hundred priests from all parts of the Diocese of Sydney attended the Requiem Mass together with scores of parishioners, paying final respects to their late parish priest. Outside the church a guard of honour was formed by girls from St Patrick’s School, Kogarah, and from St Finbar’s School, Sans Souci, and boys from the Marist Brothers’ High School, Kogarah. The cadet corps of the latter school, with the boys in uniform and carrying rifles, was a distinctive feature. 

Archbishop Gilroy paid a memorable tribute to the late Monsignor O’Driscoll, whom he had known personally for many years. Archbishop Gilroy, had also been a resident of St George for a long period prior to entering the priesthood. Since being a priest he had a close contact with Monsignor, in particular, while he was secretary to the Apostolic Delegation. The Archbishop spoke of the late priest’s career in a life time devoted so faithfully to his church and he emphasised the wonderful and outstanding work which he had carried out during his thirty-eight years leadership of the Catholic faith in the Kogarah parish. Tribute was paid to the deceased’s rare qualities as a churchman and as an administrator. The Archbishop, who said he had been a true friend of high and noble character, referred to various personal recollections of his friendship with Monsignor O’Driscoll. The Archbishop expressed his sympathy with the clergy and parishioners in their great loss. 

The funeral cortege was one of the largest ever seen in the district. It was led by the cadets of the Marist Brothers High School, Kogarah; proceeding from the church via Montgomery Street and Railway Parade to Carlton where a police escort led the way to Woronora Cemetery. It was stated that it had been the late Monsignor O’Driscoll’s personal wish to be interred among his people at Woronora. He was the second Catholic priest to be buried there.

Perhaps there could be no more fitting memorial to the late Monsignor than that in the shape of the great inscribed bell upon which his name is engraved for all time. The full text of the inscription, which is in Latin, has the following meaning: -

“John Joseph O’Driscoll, the successor of Peter Byrne, the first pastor of this parish, gave me (ie the bell) in pious memory of him so that I might call the faithful to St Patrick’s Church to give praise to God. John Carroll, bishop of Lismore, dedicated me for this purpose on the feast of St Patrick in the year 1936.”


REVEREND MONSIGNOR THOMAS O’FARRELL, 1942 -1965

‘A MANS MAN’ by CHRIS KELLY

“What a fine figure of a man” Himself said, as he proudly paraded in front of the large mirror of Chris Kelly’s Tailors shop! And indeed what an imposing figure was the Right Reverend Monsignor
Thomas O’Farrell squire of St Patrick’s Parish Kogarah. He stood some 5ft 9inches in height with a barrel chest and a portly body. His grey-blue eyes gleamed with mischief.

 Before arriving in Kogarah he had been Parish Priest of Dapto on the South Coast. He had arrived at Dapto with his sister as housekeeper and a team of racing greyhounds. Dapto of course has a Greyhound racetrack. How convenient!

According to the Mons he packed his sister back to Ireland because she ‘was interfering too much’. The Mons did not take kindly to those who disagreed with him.

 After some time in Dapto he was appointed to St Patrick’s Kogarah. It was an act of divine providence so far as ‘Himself’ was concerned. From the front steps of the church you had a perfect view of Moorefield racecourse. This joy was soon clouded by the news from Archbishop (Cardinal) Gilroy that he would not be permitted to train and race his beloved greyhounds in Sydney.

 The Mons used to look forward to the Moorefield race-days, usually two or three times a year. He often viewed the early morning track-work from the front steps of the church using a pair of high-powered binoculars.

 Saturday races of course coincided with Saturday confessions, which from memory went from 3pm to 5pm. If Mons was hearing confession he would take his binoculars into the confessional with him. He knew precisely the starting times of each race and just before the barrier went up he would suddenly dash out of the confessional and hasten to the front steps, there to view the race. As soon as the race was over he would retreat back to the confessional to continue with hearing confessions. Some time later Mons was appointed Course Chaplain at Moorefield. The Jockeys had threatened to strike if their spiritual needs were not addressed. By coincidence a number of leading jockeys belonged to St Patrick’s Parish.

 Around 1947 Mons appointed a Latvian refugee, whose name was Pauline, as housekeeper. Pauline could barely speak a word of English and with his broad Irish accent he was hard to understand at the best of times. Surprisingly they got on well together. Pauline stayed for a few years and after a number of temporary housekeepers Mrs Curtis arrived with her daughter Joyce and son Kevin. They lived in a small flat at the rear of the presbytery. Joyce is still an active member of the Parish.

Among the “characters” doing odd jobs for Monsignor was Frankie. He was a midget in his fifties, of gingery Irish complexion, balding and with extremely poor eyesight. Mons used to do the banking on a Monday with little Frankie tagging along behind carrying a gun. The “gun” was actually a starting pistol. Just as well as goodness knows what would have happened if Frankie had been called upon to fire a real gun!

 Mons was the Patriarch of the Catholic community in the St George District. He commanded enormous respect from those of all political parties, who actively courted his support. He was however a staunch socialist. Further, he was very aware of how important it was to have good responsible people involved in the political arena. Many were influenced and encouraged by the Mons to become active in politics.

 There were no Planned Giving envelopes in those days and no government funds for Catholic schools. Revenue was raised by means of a weekly ‘Housie’ night, now called ‘Bingo’ and a yearly school Fete. Apart from stalls at the Fete, there were also many gambling games used to raise funds.

 It is nice to recall that one of Monsignors’ closest friends was the Reverend Scott from the local Presbyterian Church. There was a great bond of friendship between them. They celebrated many New Years Eve’s together, which also happened to be Mons birthday.

 The story is told that when Monsignor O’Farrell finally returned to his home town, Listowel in Ireland, he arranged to say mass in his local parish Church. As he was leaving the Church after mass he overheard the conversation of two women: ‘Who was the stranger saying Mass’ said one. ‘I don’t know’ replied the other ‘ but I couldn’t understand a word he said’! He of course felt he still had his strong Irish brogue, something he actually prided himself on. Later during his stay his mother rebuked him for being belligerent to his sister, ‘Thomas’ she said, ‘You deserve to be sent to Botany Bay for the way you’re treating your sister’. ‘Woman’ the Mons replied, ‘I’ve been looking at it for the past twenty one years!’

 Monsignor Thomas O’Farrell will be remembered as a good shepherd to his flock. He was a man of great compassion, particularly to the poor and unfortunate. He supported many families with food, school fees and jobs around the Presbytery. At the same time, his curates could expect a hard time if they disregarded his instructions. But, he never failed to be there when needed most - he was a true shepherd to his flock.

 

RELIGIOUS SISTERS AT ST PATRICK’S KOGARAH

In 1885 His Eminence Cardinal Moran invited Mother Francis McGuigan, Mother General of the Sisters of Charity, to establish a community of her nuns at Hurstville and to open schools in the district and also in Kogarah.

Late in 1886 the Sisters of Charity, under the guidance of Sister M. Genevieve Cusack R.S.C., staffed St Patrick’s School Kogarah. The Sisters teaching at Kogarah made the journey, from Hurstville to Kogarah, for the first two or three years on foot. But the opening of Rockdale school necessitated the purchase of a horse and sulky in 1889, to convey the Sisters to their different destinations.

In 1909 the parishes of Hurstville, Kogarah and Rockdale were separated. The priest in charge of Hurstville was, naturally, desirous to have a separate foundation of Sisters at Hurstville. Reverend Mother was unable to meet his wishes at the time, so at the end of 1909 the Sisters of Charity withdrew from Kogarah for want of personnel and handed Kogarah over to the Sisters of St Joseph.

The time line of the Sister of St Joseph at St Patrick’s Kogarah was as follows:

1911 - Sisters of St Joseph commenced teaching at St Patrick’s

1913 - Sisters of St Joseph settled in a Convent at Kogarah. It is not known if the Convent then was the house in Chapel Street. 
1950’s - By the late 1950’s two houses in Chapel Street had been joined to form one large house and four bedrooms had been added at the back.
1950’s a new Infants school was built. The older building was still used for Primary grades and Secondary to Intermediate class.
1963, The last Intermediate class was held at Kogarah and St Patrick’s became a Primary School only.|
1964, The Regional Secondary School was conducted from St Joseph’s School at Rockdale.
1965, The Regional Secondary School moved to Kogarah. The premises of the former St George Leagues Club, adjacent to St Patrick’s Church and School, were purchased and became the new Secondary School.

1979/1980. An application for a building grant for St Patrick’s Primary School was lodged with the Schools Commission. An Engineers report stated, that after examining the old building and comparing the cost of repair with the construction of a new building, recommended the demolition of the old building and the erection of a new building at right angles to the Infants School. The cost was estimated to be approximately $237,000.

1985. The Sisters of St Joseph left St Patrick’s Kogarah.

 

PRINCIPALS AT ST. PATRICK’S KOGARAH 

 

1913 - 1914 Sr. Anastasia Roe

1914 - 1916 Sr. Raphael Gerlock

1916 - 1918 Sr. Hieronyme Tanner

1918 - 1920 Sr. Syra Egan

1921 - 1922 Sr. Hieronyme Tanner

1923 - 1930 Sr. Justinian Madden

1931 - 1941 Sr. Hieronyme Tanner

1942 - 1946 Sr. Edwardine Kelleher

1947 - 1951 Sr. Hieronyme Tanner

1952 - 1954 Sr. Aloysius Rowan

1955 - 1960 Sr. Cyprian Smith

1961 - 1963 Sr. Fiacre Brock

 

ST PATRICK’S PRIMARY SCHOOL

1964 - 1966 Sr. Fiacre Brock

1967 - 1973 Sr. Winifred Tuttle

1974 - 1979 Sr. Frances Teresa Taaffe

1980 - 1981 Sr. Margaret Candrick

1982 - 1985 Sr. Ita O’Flynn

SISTERS OF ST JOSEPH TEACHING AT ST. PATRICK'S 1911 - 1984

1911 

Sister Hieronyme Tanner

1912 

Sister Hieronyme Tanner

1913 

Sister Anastasia Roe; Sister Hieronyme Tanner

1914 

Sister Raphael Gerock; Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Ausberta Richards

1915 

Sister Raphael Gerock; Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Ausberta Richards

1916

Sister Raphael Gerock; Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Ausberta Richards;

Sister Ignatius Glacken

1917

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Ignatius Glacken

1918 

Sister Syra Egan Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Ignatius Glacken

1919

Sister Syra Egan; Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Ignatius Glacken

1920

Sister Syra Egan; Sister Ignatius Glacken

1921

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Camillus Crosby

1922

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Camillus Crosby; Sister Rosa Hawkes;

Sister Elaine Ryan; Sister Eskill Gillam

1923

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Justinian Madden; Sister Camillus Crosby;

Sister Flavian Crotty; SisterAlice Rowan; Sister Elaine Ryan

1924

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Justinian Madden; Sister Thea Fitzgerald;

Sister Alice Rowan; Sister Elaine Ryan

1925

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Justinian Madden; Sister Athanasius Bolt;

Sister Elaine Ryan

1926

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Justinian Madden; Sister Thea Fitzgerald;

Sister Frances Ita Kennedy

1927

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Justinian Madden; Sister Thea Fitzgerald;

Sister Ligouri Hancock; Sister Frances Ita Kennedy;

Sister Theophane Venard McSweeney

1928

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Justinian Madden; Sister Imelda Hyland;

Sister Thea Fitzgerald; Sister Ligouri Hancock; Sister Frances Ita Kennedy;

Sister Theophane Venard McSweeney; Sister Imeldine Richardson

1929

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Justinian Madden; Sister Imelda Hyland;

Sister Agneta Crowley; Sister Thea Fitzgerald; Sister Ligouri Hancock;

Sister Francis Ita Kennedy; Sister Imeldine Richardson

1930

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Imelda Hyland; Sister Thea Fitzgerald;

Sister BrigidAnthony Minogue; Sister Frances Ita Kennedy;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Ausberta Richards

1931

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Joseph Ignatius Bell;

Sister Brigid Anthony Minogue; Sister Cecilia O'Brien; Sister Editha Larkin;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Ausberta Richards

 

1932

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Stephanie Maunsell;

Sister Joseph Ignatius Bell; Sister Cecilia O'Brien; Sister Editha Larkin;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Ausberta Richards

1933

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Ginerva Ross;

Sister Stephanie Maunsell; Sister Joseph Ignatius Bell; Sister Cecilia O'Brien;

Sister Margaret (Cornelius) Collins; Sister Editha Larkin; Sister Imeldine Richardson;

Sister Ausberta Richards

1934

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Ginerva Ross;

Sister Stephanie Maunsell; Sister Cecilia O'Brien; Sister Margaret Collins;

Sister Editha Larkin; Sister Imeldine Richardson

1935

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Ida (Leontius) Smith;

Sister Margaret Collins; Sister Editha Larkin; Sister Imeldine Richardson

1936

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Ida Smith;

Sister Celestine Campbell; Sister Margaret Collins; Sister Editha Larkin;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

1937

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Ida Smith;

Sister Celestine Campbell; Sister Imelda Sharpe; Sister Editha Larkin;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

1938

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Marion Joseph Clements;

Sister Ida Smith; Sister Celestine Campbell; Sister Imelda Sharpe;

Sister Editha Larkin; Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

1939

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; SisterMarion Joseph Clements; Sister Ida Smith;

Sister Joseph Ignatius Bell; Sister Celestine Campbell; Sister Edward Haggerty;

Sister Editha Larkin; Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

1940

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Michael McGinty; Sister Ida Smith;

 Sister Imelda Sharpe; Sister Celestine Campbell; Sister Edward Haggerty;

Sister Editha Larkin; Sister lmeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

 

1941

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Michael McGinty; Sister Austin Mulligan;

Sister Vincentia King; Sister Imelda Sharpe; Sister Edward Haggerty;

 Sister Editha Larkin; Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

1942

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Edwardine Kelleher; Sister Austin Mulligan;

Sister Vincentia King; Sister Michael McGinty; Sister Editha Larkin;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

1943

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Edwardine Kelleher; Sister Austin Mulligan;

Sister Vincentia King; Sister Michael McGinty; Sister Editha Larkin;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

1944

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Edwardine Kelleher; Sister Austin Mulligan;

Sister Marita Wilton; Sister Editha Larkin; Sister Imeldine Richardson;

Sister Damian Heffernan

1945

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Edwardine Kelleher; Sister Austin Mulligan;

Sister Paul Cullerton; Sister Marita Wilton; Sister Imeldine Richardson;

Sister Damian Heffernan

1946

Sister Fulgentius Duffy; Sister Edwardine Kelleher; Sister Austin Mulligan;

Sister Liam Murphy; Sister Marita Wilton; Sister Dorothy Starr;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan

1947

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Austin Mulligan; Sister Germanus Hegarty;

Sister Cajetan McDonnell; Sister Marita Wilton; Sister Dorothy Starr;

Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan; Sister Monica O'Carroll;

Sister Judith Roebuck (from May)

1948

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Austin Mulligan; Sister Fursey Carolan;

Sister Mary (Benedict) Horan; Sister Marita Wilton; Sister Teresa Martin Kelly;

Sister Catherine Rowan; Sister Imeldine Richardson; Sister Damian Heffernan;

Sister Monica O'Carroll

1949

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Austin Mulligan; Sister Fursey Carolan;

Sister Mary Horan; Sister Marita Wilton; Sister Teresa Martin Kelly;

Sister Catherine (Justus) Rowan; Sister Magdalene Parker; Sister Damian Heffernan; Sister Monica O'Carroll

1950

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Gerard Lynam; Sister Gerardus McDonnell;

Sister Mary Horan; Sister Philomena Burford; Sister Teresa Martin;

Sister Alberta Murray; Sister Magdalene Parker; Sister Damian Heffernan;

Sister Monica O'Carroll

1951

Sister Hieronyme Tanner; Sister Brigid Anglim; Sister Eusebius Cummings;

Sister Mary Horan; Sister Philomena Burford; Sister Teresa Martin Kelly;

Sister Magdalene Parker; Sister Liam Murphy; Sister Monica O'Carroll

1952

Sister Aloysius Rowan; Sister Brigid Anglim; Sister Remigius Fitzgerald;

Sister Carmeletta Healy; Sister Philomena Burford; Sister Teresa Martin Kelly;

Sister Vincentia King; Sister Valery Barr; Sister Liam Murphy;

Sister Monica O'Carroll

1953

Sister Aloysius Rowan; Sister Brigid Anglim; Sister Remigius Fitzgerald;

Sister Carmeletta Healy; Sister Philomena Burford; Sister Teresa Martin Kelly;

Sister Vincentia King; Sister Valery Barr; Sister Liam Murphy;

Sister Monica O'Carroll

1954

Sister Aloysius Rowan; Sister Benoit Cullen; Sister Carmeletta Healy;

Sister Philomena Burford; Sister Teresa Martin Kelly; Sister Vincentia King;

Sister Liam Murphy; Sister Valery Barr; Sister Patricia Brew;

Sister Monica O'Carroll; Sister Ausberta Richards

1955

Sister Cyprian Smith; Sister Conleth Foley; Sister Philip Neri McPhillips;

Sister Margaret Francis O'Farrell; Sister Etienne Hogan; Sister Theophilus Robertson;

Sister Annette Hickey; Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Monica O'Carroll;

Sister Liam Murphy

1956

Sister Cyprian Smith; Sister Conleth Foley; Sister Margaret Francis O'Farrell;

Sister Philip Neri McPhillips; Sister Etienne Hogan; Sister Francis Eugene O'Donnell;

Sister Annette Hickey; Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Liam Murphy;

Sister Dorothy Joseph Wilkinson

 

 

1957

Sister Cyprian Smith; Sister Patricia Gray; Sister Philip Neri McPhillips;

Sister Carmel (Anthony Joseph) Maybon; Sister Etienne Hogan;

Sister Francis Eugene O'Donnell; Sister Annette Hickey; Sister Bernice Ross;

Sister Dorothy Joseph Wilkinson; Sister Columba Ryan

1958

Sister Cyprian Smith; Sister Patricia Gray; Sister Philip Neri McPhillips;

Sister Francis Eugene O'Donnell; Sister Etienne Hogan;

Sister Mary (Patricia) Luscombe (from May); Sister Benedetta Bennett;

Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Dorothy Joseph Wilkinson; Sister Annette Hickey

1959

Sister Cyprian Smith; Sister Patricia Gray; Sister Philip Neri McPhillips;

Sister Francis Eugene O'Donnell; Sister Mary Luscombe; Sister Etienne Hogan;

Sister Teresa Clare Heath; Sister Maureen Wornes; Sister Philip Kelly;

Sister Dorothy Joseph Wilkinson; Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Maria Louis Quinane

 

1960

Sister Cyprian Smith; Sister Francis Eugene O'Donnell; Sister Etienne Hogan;

Sister Teresa Clare Heath; Sister Maureen Wornes; Sister CeciliaGleeson;

Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Ethnea Barr; Sister Patricia (Peter Julian) Harrison;

Sister Dorothy Joseph Wilkinson; Sister Maria Louis Quinane

1961

Sister Fiacre Brock; Sister Francis Eugene O'Donnell; Sister Etienne Hogan;

Sister Teresa Clare Heath; Sister Maureen Wornes; Sister Cecilia Gleeson;

Sister Ethnea Barr; Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Dorothy Joseph Wilkinson;

Sister Maria Louis Quinane

1962

Sister Fiacre Brock; Sister Magdala Bennett; Sister Ethnea Barr;

Sister Angela Demas; Sister Teresa Clare Heath; Sister Eleanor Dawson;

Sister Maria Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Patricia Brewer;

Sister Dorothy Joseph Wilkinson; Sister T'heophilus Robertson;

Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Maria Louis Quinane

 

1963

Sister Fiacre Brock; Sister Magdala Bennett; Sister Ethnea Barr;

Sister Angela Demas; Sister Brigid Killen; Sister Ligouri Hancock;

Sister Eleanor Dawson; Sister Maria Brendan O'Sullivan; Sister Bernice Ross

1964

Sister Fiacre Brock; Sister Ethnea Barr; Sister Angela Demas; Sister Brigid Killen;

Sister Ligouri Hancock; Sister Eleanor Dawson; Sister Maria Brendan O’Sullivan;

Sister Bernice Ross

1965

Sister Fiacre Brock; Sister Ethnea Barr; Sister Angela Demas; Sister Brigid Killen;

Sister Ligouri Hancock; Sister Eleanor Dawson; Sister Celsus O'Reilly;

Sister Bernice Ross

1966

Sister Fiacre Brock; Sister Ethnea Barr; Sister Celsus O'Reilly; Sister Brigid Killen;

Sister Ligouri Hancock; Sister Eleanor Dawson; Sister Bernice Ross;

Sister Joseph Mercedes Mullins

 

1967

Sister Winifred Tuttle; Sister Ligouri Hancock; Sister Joseph Mercedes Mullins; Sister Ultan Carney; Sister Imelda Morrison; Sister Bernadette Gibson;

Sister Celsus O'Reilly; Sister Marie (Immaculata) Carson; Sister Remigius Fitzgerald; Sister Bernice Ross

1968

Sister Winifred Tuttle; Sister Ultan Carney; Sister Bernadette Gibson;

Sister Regina Doody; Sister Pauline Blofield; Sister Marie Carson;

Sister Celsus O'Reilly; Sister Joseph Mercedes Mullins

1969

Sister Winifred Tuttle; Sister Ultan Carney; Sister Bernadette Gibson;

Sister Eileen (Oda) O'Donovan; Sister Regina Doody; Sister Pauline Blofield;

Sister Julie (Ethnea) O'Leary; Sister Bernice Ross

1970

Sister Winifred Tuttle; Sister Valera Rowan; Sister Berchmans Kane;

Sister Antonine O'Neil; Sister Margaret Rose Sweeny; Sister Pauline Blofield;

Sister Anne O'Connell; Sister Bride Scally; Sister Bernice Ross

 

1971

Sister Winifred Tuttle; Sister Valera Rowan; Sister Ultan Carney;

Sister Margaret Rose Sweeny; Sister Pauline Blofield; Sister Bride Scally;

Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Brigid (Flannan) O'Halloran

1972

Sister Winifred Tuttle; Sister Francis Teresa Taaffe; Sister Margaret Rose Sweeny;

Sister Pauline Blofield; Sister Brigid O'Halloran; Sister Jose Hale; Sister Bernice Ross

1973

Sister Winifred Tuttle; Sister Francis Teresa Taaffe; Sister Margaret Rose Sweeny;

Sister Pauline Blofield; Sister Jose Hale; Sister Marie Therese Tyrer;

Sister Bernice Ross

1974

Sister Francis Teresa Taaffe; Sister Margaret Rose Sweeny; Sister Marion Quinn; Sister Jose Hale; Sister Marie Therese Tyrer; Sister Yvonne McGettigan;

Sister Bernice Ross

1975

Sister Francis Teresa Taaffe; Sister Margaret Rose Sweeny; Sister Marion Quinn; Sister Jose Hale; Sister Helen Brosnan; Sister Catherine Wilson; Sister Marita Wilton; Sister Bernice Ross; Sister Gerard Majella Moy

1976 

Sister Francis Teresa Taaffe; Sister Marion Quinn; Sister Helen Brosnan;

Sister Jean Vianney Plummer; Sister Rosalie Matthews; Sister Catherine Wilson;

Sister Gerard Majella Moy; Sister Margaret Therese Cusack

 1977

Sister Francis Teresa Taaffe; Sister Marion Quinn; Sister Helen Brosnan;

Sister Jean Vianney Plummer; Sister Rosalie Matthews; Sister Margaret Ferris;

Sister Gerard Majella Moy; Sister Margaret Therese Cusack

1978

Sister Francis Teresa Taaffe; Sister Marion Quinn; Sister Jean Vianney Plummer;

Sister Rosalie Matthews; Sister Helen Brosnan; Sister Edwardine Beaumont;

Sister Gerard Majella Moy

1979

Sister Marge Candrick; Sister Jean Vianney Plummer; Sister Rosalie Matthews;

Sister Edwardine Beaumont; Sister Rosita Kiss; Sister Gerard Majella Moy

1980

Sister Marge Candrick; Sister David Hegarty; Sister Catherine Duggan;

Sister Edwardine Beaumont

1981

Sister Marge Candrick; Sister David Hegarty; Sister Betty Bourke

1982

Sister Ita O'Flynn; Sister David Hegarty

1983

Sister Ita O'Flynn; Sister David Hegarty

1984

Sister Ita O'Flynn; Sister David Hegarty

The list of the Sisters of St Joseph who have lived and worked at Kogarah, as far as they can ascertain, has been supplied by the Archivist of the Sisters of St Joseph.

 

TODAY

 

THE SCHOOL

As we celebrate 150 Years of continuous Catholic education at St Patrick’s Kogarah we have much to reflect on and much to be thankful for. ll who have, in any way, been involved with the school over this time have contributed in their own unique way to this great success story. In some ways we have come full circle, as the first teachers were lay and we again, 140 years later, have a total staff of lay teachers. However, teacher and student numbers have varied considerably over the years as has the size of the school and it is amazing when one realises that all this education has been accommodated on the same site established by our forbearers so long ago.

In 1862 there were 21 pupils, by 1915 the number had grown to 150 pupils and by the 1940s over 300 pupils. With the population boom after 1945 numbers grew to about 550 in 1960 with classes averaging more than 50 pupils. Over these last forty years numbers have fluctuated, perhaps because of demographic changes in the area, with 300 pupils attending the school in 2002.

From the late 1960s St Patrick’s became part of the Archdiocesan system of schools administered by the Catholic Education Office, (CEO) Sydney. The Sisters of St Joseph continued their leadership of the school until 1985, after which the CEO, Sydney appointed a lay principal Miss Gloria Booby, who was school principal till 1990. Miss Pamela Fitzpatrick followed as school principal from 1991 to 1998, Mr Greg Thornton was school principal from 1999 to 2002 and Mrs Jo Fox was appointed school principal in 2003. By 1990s all the teachers were lay. Another change in 1983 was the retention of boys to Year 6 in line with Archdiocesan policy that primary schools be parish based.

 

THE PRESBYTERY

The original presbytery of St Patrick’s Kogarah, blessed and opened in 1897, was still the home of the priest/s till 1991. The building and its interior were admired for their original style and beauty, but sadly were no longer practical and in need of a great deal of maintenance, the cost of which would have been exorbitant. Further, there were three other houses on the Church property, originally the Convent of the Sisters of St Joseph, two of which were now empty and also in need of repair. So in 1990 a decision was taken to demolish these three buildings and to build a new presbytery on the land facing Chapel Street. The three car garages, at the rear of this site, facing the driveway opposite the St Joseph Girls’ School, were retained.

The demolition of the two houses facing Chapel Street occurred in late 1990. The new presbytery was to be constructed on this site. The design chosen was a two storey brick ‘Denmay Home’. The work on the building commenced in February 1991 and was completed in July 1991. The new presbytery was modern, large and comfortable. Once occupied the original presbytery was demolished. During 1992 this area of land was made into a grassed area ‘The Parish Park’ and the section adjacent to the Church was planted with numerous native trees and became known as ‘The Rain Forest’. Further, a sealed car park was established at the end of the driveway between the new presbytery and the St Josephs’ Girls School.

The building of a new presbytery and the redevelopment of the overall site have enabled St Patrick’s Church property to be fully utilised.

 

THE CHURCH

 It is great to see that St Patrick’s Church is today seen as a beautiful old Church. The continued maintenance of the Church over these last one hundred seventeen years, by priests and parishioners alike, has given us the Church we know today. This is evidenced by the fact that the Church is highly sought for weddings, being seen as a ‘traditional’ Church, ascetically appealing for such important occasions. Much credit must be given to our forbearers for choosing such an impressive building for the Church of St Patrick’s Kogarah.

As we have read in earlier sections of this book, the Church has had many changes over the years. The reasons for such changes are not documented but no doubt were valid at the particular time and fortunately have always respected the original design of the Church.

In accordance with the outcomes of Vatican 11, Father Tom Leonard Parish Priest arranged the removal of the beautiful wrought iron altar rails. The sanctuary area was then carpeted in a fine red wool carpet covering the original terrazzo floor. At this same time the Sanctuary Lamp, which hung over the sanctuary area from the high cross beams, was moved to the back wall adjacent to the marble altar. It is understood that this move was in the main for safety reasons.

 The main entrance to the Church was one of those changes, but in 1989 Father John Keeble Parish Priest, arranged for the replacement of the front steps to resemble the original design, giving us once again a more open entrance. At this same time the interior foyer area was redesigned with timber and glass panels along with a centre and two side doors. Work was also undertaken on the Church pews to restore them to their natural timber colouring. Further, the confessional box on the northern side of the Church was removed and a Shrine to St Patrick created in its place.

During the tenure of Father Frank Furfaro, Parish Priest, much work was undertaken to enhance the interior of the Church.

A Shrine for the sick was created in the southern wall of the Church (previously the site of the confessional) in 1996. The Shrine is dedicated to: Our Lady Health of the Sick.

 Our Lady’s face is that of a maiden, a young women in fidelity to the Scriptures. Her gentle smile shares with us a peaceful and grateful acceptance of the will of God, as well as a sign of peace. Her outstretched and open arms and hands signify an openness to God’s will in every situation. Her dress is simple to convey that Mary was an ordinary person called to be the Mother of God, and that from the ordinary and everyday greatness and holiness are born.

On the wall of the Shrine are four plaques:

St Luke, is called by St Paul ‘our dear and glorious physician’. St Luke is the patron saint of Doctors - all Physicians.

St Dymphna, is patroness of those with nervous, mental and stress related illnesses.

St Peregrine, is the patron saint of those with cancer. He was born in 1265, as a youth was a fiery and impetuous leader of a faction fostering civil discord and opposition to the Pope. Heroically, Peregrine gave up his companions and devoted his life to penance, prayer, and care of the sick in hospitals, as a Servant of Mary.

Mary Potter is the Foundress of the Little Company of Mary, a Nursing Order known as the ‘Blue Nuns’. The Sisters of the Little Company of Mary were founded in New South Wales shortly after they were founded in Nottingham, England, in 1877. Former Archbishop of Sydney, Cardinal James Freeman, writes ‘….. She taught her Sisters to foster the love of Christ in their own hearts so that together with their sympathy and medical skill they might bring Him with His Divine consolation and power to those tendered prostrate and helpless by sickness and pain….’ May the example of Mary Potter inspire all nurses and carers of the sick.

In 1997 the Church was re-carpeted.

Between 1997 and 2002 a number of new statues were installed in St Patrick’s Church namely:

  • A beautiful wooden carved statue of Blessed Mary MacKillop was erected high up on the back wall of the left transept.
  • Two exquisite angel statues were again placed on the marble stands on either side of the original altar.
  • The statues of Mary, the Mother of Jesus and St John, the Apostle have again been installed at the foot of the large crucifix (original), high on the back wall behind the marble altar.
  • To complete the front external wall, the statues of St Patrick and Our Lady Help of Christians (check) have been placed in the vacant alcoves located above the front entrance to the Church.

The parishioners of St Patrick’s Kogarah also thank Father Frank Furfaro for acquiring the beautiful gold processional crucifix now very much part of our liturgy and for devising the lectern from the original Paschal Candle stand donated by a pioneer many years ago.

The architects of St Patrick’s Church would have us believe that every window was designed to be of stained glass depicting a saint or important religious event. However, in 2000 six windows in the nave of the church and four in the foyer area were still in the original pink leadlight glass, no doubt chosen on an interim basis due to the high cost of stained glass. In commemoration of the Jubilee Year, Parish Priest, Father Frank Furfaro, in conjunction with the parishioners, decided to complete the work of the parish founders and install the missing stained glass windows.

The theme of the windows in the body of the church is that all are 20th century saints, which flows through the choice of:

1. Blessed Mary Mackillop, to honour the work of the Josephite sisters in the parish

2. St Marcellin Champagnat, honours the work in the parish of the Marist Brothers, the French order St Marcellin founded in 1817

 3. St Elizabeth Seton, recognises the dedication of single parents

 4. St Maximillian Kolbe, honours those who lost their lives in war

 5. St Anthony of Padua, pays homage to the largely European origins of many Sydney Catholics

 6. St Edith Stein, was selected to honour the Jewish heritage of Christians.

The saints chosen for the stained glass windows in foyer of the church follow the theme of trusting expressions of faith in our times. The people chosen have lived in the last century, and are known widely for their Christian witness and example.

  1. Eileen O’Connor, founder of Our Lady’s Nurses, known as the ‘Brown Nurses” whose vocation was to tend the sick in their homes.
  2. Blessed Maria & Luigi Beltrame Quattrocchi, who are the first married couple to be beatified by the Pope, in the history of the Catholic Church.
  3. Oscar Romero, Archbishop of El Salvador in South America, who was assassinated while celebrating Mass in his Cathedral. He stood for the poor and marginalised and spoke out for those with no voice in a politically oppressive system.
  4. Mother Teresa of Calcutta, founder of the Missionaries of Charity whose vocation is to care for the poorest of the poor, while strong in India, they are now to be found in many countries around the world, including Australia.
  5. Blessed Josemaria Escriva, who founded the Opus Dei movement. Opus Dei means Work for God. Members are called to offer their everyday work to God. Some members are called to live celibate lives in community.

Once the parish had selected the saints, it was up to artist Patty Robinson to fulfil the vision. Ms Robinson researched the saints’ lives to look for things particular to that saint and then literally created the windows. Donations were received to cover the cost of the stained glass windows and the names of the donors are incorporated at the base of the relevant window.

The installation of the windows was completed in 2003. On Sunday 20 July 2003, Cardinal George Pell D.D., Archbishop of Sydney, was invited to St Patrick’s Kogarah to be the Principal Celebrant at 10 am Mass and perform the Rite of Blessing of the newly installed stained glass windows. Donors, benefactors, visitors and parishioners attended this Mass in large numbers. A morning tea in the Church grounds followed, the high level of laughter and talking displayed, gave evidence to the excitement that was felt in seeing the dream of our forbearers come to fruition.

Clergy and laity alike have admired the beauty of the stained glass windows, which have further enhanced the Church of St Patrick’s Kogarah, one hundred and seventeen years after the first Mass was celebrated.

 

CHRONOLOGY OF ST PATRICK’S PARISH KOGARAH

3 MAY 1820

The first official Catholic priests arrived in the infant Colony of New South Wales. They were Rev. Fathers John Joseph Therry and Philip Conolly. They arrived in the Port of Sydney on board the ship “JANUS”. The “JANUS” was a convict ship (a former whaling ship). The voyage took 150 days and came via Rio de Janerio, which was one of the main routes of the convict ships. It had sailed from Cork, Ireland on 5 December 1819 with 105 female convicts onboard. During the voyage there were two deaths onboard, one was a female convict, and the other was the ship’s surgeon, James Creagh.

29 October 1821

His Excellency Governor Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of New South Wales, laid the Foundation stone of St Mary’s Chapel (old St Mary’s Cathedral). Governor Macquarie left his personal donation on the foundation stone.

19 June 1836

St Mary’s Cathedral was dedicated to the Mother of God. (3) (It served the Catholics of the sparsely populated Colony for many years until it was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1865. At about 9.00pm, a passer-by, Mr Grogan, saw flames inside the church and raised the alarm. The only priest at home was Rev. Father J.M. Garavel SM, who barely had time to remove the Blessed Sacrament; but not without considerable risk, as the fire had started near the High Altar. This was the same Father Garavel who, as Priest-in-Charge of the district, blessed and opened the old stone Church/School building at Kogarah on 15 May 1866).

1841

First Church for the southern districts was in the Liverpool Parish. This Parish extended from Penrith to the shores of Botany Bay. It was under the guidance of Rev. Father Marum.

1850s

Influx of permanent Settlers – mainly Market Gardeners and Timber Cutters. Rocky Point Road Catholic School first established. 11 boys, 10 girls were on the roll, it did not flourish and was closed.

1864

The school re-opened in a wooden building on the eastern side of Rocky Point Road, just south of the Moorefield Estate. There were 19 children on the roll. The teacher was Miss M Eyre on annual salary of £60.

20 April 1865

A acre of land, on which present Church now stands, was purchased for £20 from Mr Charles Bown.

11 December 1865

Deeds of the property submitted to the Denominational School Board, for a grant towards the cost of the erection of a stone building. The cost was expected to be £120. A grant of £30 was approved. An amount of £4.10.00 was granted towards the outlay of £9.0.0 for furniture.

15 May 1866

The new stone Church/School Building officially opened by Rev Father J M Garavel SM, with the celebration of Mass. Newtown became officially a Parish. Catholics of St George had to travel to Newtown for Mass.

1884

The Railway came to Kogarah. Increase in population started to occur. Sisters of Charity, who were living at Hurstville, accepted the invitation to teach at St Patrick’s School Kogarah

29 April 1887

Foundation stone of new Church was blessed and laid in front of original stone church/school building by His Eminence Cardinal Moran. Very Rev Father Slattery, OSF, delivered the address to several hundred people. Rev Father Peter Byrne spoke briefly and called on the people to show their generosity. A total sum of £685 was laid on the stone.

19 February 1888

His Eminence Cardinal Moran returned to the Parish to bless and open the Church. Architects: Messrs Sheerin & Hennessy. Builders: Messrs Simmons & Knight.

The Parish and School were named St Patrick’s after the Apostle of Ireland

5 February 1890

His Eminence Cardinal Moran opened a fund-raising bazaar for the Church in the School of Arts, Kogarah. He found the district more advanced than during his visit in 1888.

June 1897

The new presbytery adjoining St Patrick’s Church, at 143 Princes Highway, Kogarah was blessed and opened by Very Reverend Dr. Carroll, vicar-General. Previously, priests had lived in the Foley’s home almost opposite the church.

1896 – 1901

Rev Father Michael Macnamara administered the parish.

1901 – 1904

Rev Father Grace administered the Parish

1904

Rev Father (later Monsignor) John O’Driscoll appointed Parish Priest.

C. 1904

Baptismal font donated to the Church by the Parishioners in memory of the late Mrs Kate Hatfield (wife of Henry Hatfield), who had died on 13 February 1904, in recognition of the work she had carried out in the Kogarah Parish.

Easter 1905

Paschal Candle Stand donated by anonymous donor.

1908

Site was chosen for the first Catholic Boys’ School (Marist Brothers Kogarah) in the St George District. Site was popularly known as Nanny Goat Hill.

1909

St Patrick’s Primary School catered for boys up to the end of Third Class. All boys went to the Marist Brothers Kogarah from Fourth Class onwards.

 Sisters of Charity withdraw from St Patrick’s Kogarah.

1911

Sisters of St Joseph were invited by Rev Father O’Driscoll to take over running of the school. The nuns originally lived at Arncliffe and travelled to Kogarah each day.

1913

First Kogarah Convent purchased for the Sisters of St Joseph.

15 March 1914

Foundation Stone of new school was blessed by His Grace Archbishop Michael Kelly. This is the two storey block built on the Chapel Street side of the grounds. A Secondary School for Girls was established.

24 June 1917

Rev Father O’Driscoll’s Silver Jubilee of Ordination to the Priesthood.

16 December 1917

Foundation Stone of the additions to the Church, (Sanctuary and Transept) was blessed by His Grace Archbishop Michael Kelly.

 1918

 Sanctuary and Transept completed and first used.

1925

Marble Altar donated in “Memory of Francis O’Meara” who died 28 July 1925.

5 July 1935

Permission granted by His Grace Archbishop Sheehan to complete the Bell Tower at a cost of £1,200 provided plans were first inspected and approved by the Diocesan Architectural Committee.

17 March 1936

Bell tower completed and bell dedicated by His Lordship Bishop J Carroll, Bishop of Lismore.

2 April 1940

His Grace Archbishop Gilroy advised by letter from Rev Father O’Driscoll public transport not good for Catholics near the Beach.

13 April 1940

Very Rev Father Edmund O’Donnell (Archbishop’s Secretary) replied to acknowledge difficulties and suggested a good church site be obtained “near the Beach or about Ramsgate”.

19 September 1940

Permission granted to buy land in Chuter Avenue and Florence Street Ramsgate for Church site.

28 September 1940

His Grace Archbishop Gilroy gave permission to lodge Deeds of the Land at Chuter Avenue and Florence Street, Ramsgate for an overdraft of £1,000 with Bank of Australasia.

Eleven parishes had been formed from the original Kogarah Parish. Namely: Hurstville, Rockdale, Penshurst, Arncliffe, Cronulla, Brighton-le-Sands, Sans Souci, Bexley, Carlton, South Hurstville and Blakehurst.

 5 June 1942

Right Rev Monsignor John O’ Driscoll died.

Rev Father (later Monsignor) Thomas O’Farrell appointed Parish Priest.

7 January 1952

 Rev Father Vincent Folkes (Administrator) wrote to His Eminence Cardinal Gilroy to advise that the old fence had been removed, and bricks were hard to get for a new wall. A quote for a new stone wall exceeded £5,000.

 27 August 1952

Rev Father O’Farrell, wrote to His Eminence Cardinal Gilroy to request permission to repair the roofs of the Presbytery and Convent which were in a very bad state. The cost would be £152.

1 March 1954

Rev Father O’Farrell, wrote to His Eminence Cardinal Gilroy for permission to sell the land in Chuter Avenue and Florence Street, Ramsgate as Council Rates had increased from £32to £56.

18 June 1954

Rev Father O’Farrell requested to delay the sale of the land, as a Church somewhere near Ramsgate was desired.

1954

Old Stone Church/School demolished to make way for a new school.

23 June 1955

New school building was blessed and opened by His Eminence Cardinal Gilroy. Approximately 500 children were enrolled. New building was built on the site of the tennis court, next door to the Convent.

14 January 1960

Most Rev Father D Carroll, Woollahra (Auxiliary to Cardinal Gilroy) granted permission for £300 to be spent to install electric fans in St Patrick’s Church.

22 November 1963

Following a letter of request dated 21 November 1963, Monsignor O’Farrell given written authority by Rev Dr Freeman, Concord, for a loan of £13,000 to purchase St George Leagues Club for school purposes.

1963

Monsignor O’Farrell celebrated the Golden Jubilee of his Ordination to the Priesthood.

Last Class of girls’ sit for Intermediate Certificate Examination at St Patrick’s Kogarah

1964

St Patrick’s School becomes a Kindergarten and Primary School only.

10 August 1966

Monsignor O’Farrell died.

 1966

 Rev Father Thomas Leonard appointed Parish Priest.

8 August 1967

In view of the condition of the bell tower, approval was given by His Eminence Cardinal Gilroy to remove the bell and brick mullions from the tower at a cost of approximately $1,000.

7 February 1968

Permission given to Rev Father Leonard by His Eminence Cardinal Gilroy to engage the services of Mr J H Brown for $2,000 for eight weeks to organise a system of Planned Giving.

1 October 1970

His Eminence Cardinal Gilroy gave permission to Rev Father Leonard to approach the Catholic Church Trust for a loan of $50,000 to meet the cost of three new classrooms, toilet block and tuck shop for the primary school.

7 March 1971

Letter to His Eminence Cardinal Gilroy from Rev Father Leonard, together with a copy of a letter to the Catholic Building and Finance Commission, which advised that an additional $17,500 was required for a second floor “shell” be erected with the three additional classrooms.

26 January 1972

Permission sought by Rev Father Leonard from His Eminence Cardinal Freeman to approach the Catholic Church Trust for a loan of a further $22,000 to meet the cost of new primary school block of six classrooms, two teachers’ rooms, tuck shop, and renovated toilet block.

 1983

 St Patrick’s School accommodates boys to Sixth Class.

 1985 

 The Sisters of St Joseph leave St Patrick’s Kogarah.

 1986 

 Lay Principal appointed at St Patrick’s School. 

 1988

 Rev Father Leonard retired Pastor Emeritus.

Rev Father John Keeble was appointed as Parish Priest.

Rev Father Thomas Leonard celebrated the Golden Jubilee of his Ordination to the Priesthood.

17 March 1989

Church pews refurbished to original wood colour.

November 1989

New German Organ purchased and installed

4 March 1989

First Kogarah Parish Council installed by His Eminence Cardinal Edward Bede Clancy,

20 August 1989

Rev Father John Keeble celebrated 20 years Anniversary of his Ordination to the Priesthood.

1990

Land in Chuter Avenue and Florence Street Ramsgate was sold.

24/25 October 1990

Rear of cottage No. 38 Chapel Street Kogarah was severely damaged by fire.

December 1990

Demolition work began on Chapel Street cottages to make way for new Presbytery and Parish Offices.

February 1991 to July 1991

New Presbytery built at 36-38 Chapel Street Kogarah, adjacent to St Patrick’s Church Kogarah.

22 May 1991

Organ repaired after being damaged by a lightning strike during a huge storm some months earlier.

11 December 1991

Original presbytery demolished.

20 January 1992

St Patrick’s Primary School playground was upgraded. Site of original presbytery was landscaped. The ‘Parish Park’ and ‘Rain Forest’ areas were created.

 15 December 1994

 Statue of Blessed Mary Mac Killop was purchased.

 January 1995

 New brass candle stands installed.

 17 July 1995

 St Patrick’s Primary School playground was re-concreted.

25 August 1996

Cardinal Edward Clancy, Archbishop of Sydney, celebrated Sunday 10.30am Mass during which he blessed the new Shrine of the Sick.

March 1997

St Patrick’s Church was re-carpeted.

2000

Two Angel statues were purchased and placed on either side of the original marble Altar.

2002

Two statues installed in alcoves on outside front wall of the Church, St Patrick on the left and Our Lady of Grace on the right. (The original intention was to have the statue of Our Lady Help of Christians, but sadly the statues available were too large for the alcove.)

19 July 2003

The statues of Our Lady and St John placed adjacent to the foot of the large Cross behind marble Altar.

20 July 2003

Archbishop Cardinal George Pell D.D., Archbishop of Sydney celebrated Sunday 10.30 am Mass with the Rite of Blessing of the new Stained Glass Windows in the nave and foyer of St Patrick’s Church.

 

ST PATRICK’S KOGARAH PRIESTS

1. Fr Peter Byrne P.P. Dec 1885 - April 1890

2. Fr Patrick Ryan May 1890 - Feb 1891

3. Fr Cornelius Conway Feb 1891 - Feb 1893

4. Fr Patrick Baugh Mar 1893 - Feb 1894

5. Fr Francis MacDermott Mar 1893 - Nov 1895

6. Fr John Dalton Mar 1894 - Sep 1894

7. Fr Edward O’Brien Nov 1894 - Oct 1898

8. Fr Joseph Bunbury Feb 1896 - May 1896

9. Fr Michael MacNamara Jul 1896 - Feb 1901

10. Fr John Sherin Oct 1898 - Sep 1900

11. Fr Thomas Barry Dec 1900 - Jun 1902

12. Fr James Grace Mar 1901 - Jan 1904

13. Fr James Dalton Aug 1902 - Oct 1905

14. Monsignor John O’Driscoll P.P. Feb 1904 - Nov 1940 ( + 5 June 1942)

15. Fr Patrick Walsh Nov 1905 - Feb 1913

16. Fr Joseph Cusack Dec 1910 - Dec 1912

17. Fr Matthew O’Donoghue Mar 1913 - Jun 1914

18. Fr Andrew Mulvihill Jun 1914 - Jun 1916

19. Fr James Dalton Mar 1915 - Feb 1916

20. Fr E A Bailey, MSC Apr 1924 - Jul 1924

21. Fr D Hannan Jul 1924 - Jan 1924

22. Fr Francis Fitzpatrick Feb 1928 - Oct 1928

23. Fr M McCarthy Nov 1928 - Jan 1938

24. Fr A Sobb Mar 1934 - Sep 1942

25. Fr M Coffey Feb 1938 - Mar 1940

26. Fr Edward Wilkinson Mar 1940 - Sep 1943

27. Fr Thomas O’Farrell P.P. Aug 1942 - Nov 1965 ( + 10 Aug 1966)

28. Fr W Ross, SVD Sep 1943 - Jul 1944

29. Fr T Berkery Dec 1944 - Sep 1946

30. Fr Denis O’Rouke Aug 1946 - Mar 1947

31. Fr Anthony Sahade Dec 1946 - Dec 1949

32. Fr John Noonan Jan 1948 - Jan 1951

33. Fr D McAuliffe Dec 1949 - Feb 1953

34. Fr Vincent Folkes Feb 1951 - Jan 1952

35. Fr Maurice Roche Feb 1953 - Apr 1953

36. Fr P Byrne Mar 1953 - July 1955

37. Fr T Purcell Dec 1954 - Nov 1956

38. Fr K Spillane Aug 1955 - Aug 1959

39. Fr M Hogan Dec 1956 - Jun 1957

40. Fr Phillip O’Donnell Jul 1957 - Dec 1957

41. Fr M Kelly Dec 1958 - Dec 1959

42. Fr A Newman Sep 1959 - Aug 1961

43. Fr F Higgins Jan 1960 - Dec 1961

44. Fr J Dooley Sep 1961 - Dec 1964

45. Fr B Ryan Dec 1961 - Dec 1965

46. Fr R Matthews Jan 1965 - Dec 1968

47. Fr Francis Coorey Jan 1966 - Jan 1970

48. Fr Thomas Leonard P.P. Oct 1966 - Feb 1988

49. Fr S Russo Sep 1968 - Jan 1969

50. Fr P Coffey May 1969 - Dec 1970

51. Fr J Ford Feb 1970 - Sep 1970

52. Fr P Morrissey Nov 1970 - Dec 1972

53. Fr M Mahoney Jan 1971 - Jan 1975

54. Fr James Boland Jan 1973 - Aug 1981

55. Fr C Sheehy Jun 1975 - Nov 1976

56. Fr Paul Foley Mar 1977 - Jun 1977

57. Fr B Sheedy Jan 1978 - May 1978

58. Fr P Zadro Mar 1982 - Nov 1982

59. Fr Martin Langron Nov 1982 - Jun 1985

60. Fr Robert Slattery Dec 1984 - Set 1987

61. Fr John Keeble P.P. Oct 1987 - Jun 1994

62. Fr John Knight Feb 1988 - Oct 1990

63. Fr Tony Bennett Nov 1990 - Sep 1992

64. Fr Greg Foley Oct 1993 - Jun 1994

65. Fr Frank Furfaro P.P. Jul 1994 - Jul 2005

66. Fr Kelvin Lovegrove Aug 1994 - Sep 1996

67. Fr Jerzy Chrzczononicz Feb 1997 - Apr 1998

68. Fr Joseph Kolodziej Nov 1998 - May 1999

69. Fr Roberto Castillo Nov 2005 - Sep 2006

70. Monsignor Henryk Micek, Oct 2006 -